One Becomes a Pair

I am astounded at myself: the second sock was completed in a day!  No second-sock syndrome here.  And with continued knitting, I'm finding it easier to read my stitches.

After completing the toe decreases, I pulled out my blunt needle for the grafting.  I remember being a novice sock knitter and struggling with the toe graft.  I wondered if the little graphic in the pattern book would scare off a newbie?

Normally I use a formula my mother-in-law taught me (a veteran sock knitter she is).  I think she found it in an old pattern book from the 50s or 60s.  Basically the process goes like this:

  • Insert needle as if to KNIT first stitch on front dpn, pull yarn through and then drop stitch off dpn
  • Insert needle as if to PURL second stitch on front dpn, pull yarn through and leave on dpn
  • Insert needle as if to PURL first stitch on back dpn, pull yarn through and drop stitch off dpn
  • Insert needle as if to KNIT second stitch on back dpn, pull yarn through and leave on dpn
  • Continue until no stitches are left

This time, with illustrations:

Insert needle as if to KNIT first stitch on front dpn, pull yarn through and then drop stitch off dpn

  • Insert needle as if to PURL second stitch on front dpn, pull yarn through and leave on dpn

Insert needle as if to PURL first stitch on back dpn, pull yarn through and drop stitch off dpn

  • Insert needle as if to KNIT second stitch on back dpn, pull yarn through and leave on dpn
  • Continue until no stitches are left

I've always found those written steps easier to follow.  If you're still having a hard time, do a search for videos on grafting (there must be loads of them on the internet).  Once you've done it, you'll be amazed at how easy it really is (I must confess that seaming used to scare me more than grafting, but each to his own).

With the socks done, I'm starting the hat.  Hope it goes as quickly as the socks.

-DinaPurls

Comments

You GO girl! (thumbs up)

Thanks! :)

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